Author: Cancer Control

Cancer Control 2016 Survey: What will the 2015-2030 SDGs mean for Cancer?

We asked a selection of Cancer Control readers around the world to give their considered opinions on what the Sustainable Development Goals (SDSs) would mean for cancer control in practical terms. Their responses are shown below by geographical region. AFRICA ETHIOPIA: Zelalem Mengistu, Programme Manager, Mathiwos Wondu-YeEthiopia Cancer Society, Ethiopia “Our society is heavily involved in tobacco control activities, which is one of the predominant preventable risk factors for cancer and other noncommunicable diseases. It is clearly reflected in SD3.This is a key milestone in mobilizing resources to control the eminent tobacco epidemic and its huge impact. On top...

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Promising options for Cervical Cancer prevention in low-resource settings

Scott Wittet (left to right), PATH and Cervical Cancer Action; Joanna Cain, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Ambassador Sally Cowal, American Cancer Society; David Fleming, PATH; Catherine Guinard, Cancer Research UK; Jose Jeronimo, PATH and Debbie Saslow, American Cancer Society The global burden of cervical cancer is high, and it is inequitable between and within countries. An estimated 266,000 women die from the disease every year, with 85% of deaths in developing countries. Twenty-five percent occur in India alone. In many countries, cervical cancer is the number one cancer killer of women and it now kills more women than childbirth in...

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Interview with Professor Richard Sullivan

Richard you are playing a key role in the Lancet Commission on Global Cancer Surgery. Can you summarise how the Commission came about and how you became involved? The Lancet Commission on global cancer surgery really rests on another commission that was published in the Lancet in August 2015 entitled “Global Surgery 2030: Evidence and solutions for achieving health welfare and economic development”.  I was the cancer representative on that original Commission, and also the lead for doing the research analysis. The Global Surgery 2030 Lancet Commission came about because there was there was a recognition that surgery had...

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Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes in Asia

    Ch Yip, Consultant Breast Surgeon, Ramsay Sime Darby Health Care, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Clinical Professor, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Visiting Consultant, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in most Asian countries, despite wide variations in ethnicity, culture and economics. The majority of Asian countries are classified as low- and middle-income, and breast cancer typically presents at a younger age and with later stages compared to their western counterparts. Lack of treatment facilities leads to poor survival, which can be improved with culturally appropriate, resource-stratified guidelines for early...

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Recommendations for Cancer Control from Disease Control Priorities, Third Edition

Hellen Gelband (Left), Associate Director For Policy, Center For Disease Dynamics, Economics And Policy, Susan Horton (Center Left), Chair, Centre For International Governance Innovation, Balsillie School Of International Affairs, University Of Waterloo, USA, Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan (Center right), Special Adviser On Cancer Control and Head of the Screening Group, International Agency For Research on Cancer, France and Prabhat Jha (Right), Professor In Global Health And Epidemiology, University Of Toronto, Canada Cancer (volume 3 of Disease Control Priorities, third edition) is a guide for low- and middle-income countries to advance cancer control through the middle of the twenty-first century. DCP3 Cancer...

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